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Day 17: Huangshan

Asia boasts some of the world’s most famous mountains, but China’s Huangshan (Yellow Mountains) remain a bit of a secret outside the country despite its designation as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. One Chinese visitor even asked a member of our group how we learned about Huangshan, surprised to see foreigners mixed into the summer holiday crowd.


Our visit coincided with the end of the rainy season. The floating fog and mist is part of what makes Huangshan such a sight to behold, but the rainy weather made clear views of its twisted peaks a rarity.

Our visit coincided with the end of the rainy season. The floating fog and mist is part of what makes Huangshan such a sight to behold, but the rainy weather made clear views of its twisted peaks a rarity.


There are two ways up for tourists—a cable car ride or a 7.5 km hike—but for the supply guys, the only option is carrying it up the old-fashioned way. The prices at the top reflect the labor.

There are two ways up for tourists—a cable car ride or a 7.5 km hike—but for the supply guys, the only option is carrying it up the old-fashioned way. The prices at the top reflect the labor.


  

On the 1,000 meter hike from the bus station to Lotus Flower Peak, we logged more than 17,000 steps--the first 5,000 of which were straight up steep steps.

On the 1,000 meter hike from the bus station to Lotus Flower Peak, we logged more than 17,000 steps–the first 5,000 of which were straight up steep steps.


At Bright Summit Peak, lovers tie padlocks to the railing and toss the key into the valley below, ensuring an eternal bond.

At Bright Summit Peak, lovers tie padlocks to the railing and toss the key into the valley below, ensuring an eternal bond.


Hiking with a few thousand of our new Chinese friends. Especially crowded due to the summer school break, we walked much of the 14 km queued up behind the masses.

Hiking with a few thousand of our new Chinese friends. Especially crowded due to the summer school break, we walked much of the 14 km queued up behind the masses.


More Photo of the Day posts from Taiwan, China, Hong Kong and Vietnam

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3 thoughts on “Day 17: Huangshan

    • We had the same experience actually. We were there during the summer holidays in August and the crowds made it slow-going. The clouds moved so fast that a clear view would only last for a couple minutes.

      We took the bus up to the cable car entrance leading to White Goose Peak. A couple people in our group waited in the line for the cable car (3 hours) and the rest of us walked up the path (about 2-2.5 hours). From White Goose Peak, we went to Bright Peak, Lotus Peak and Turtle Peak to the cable car at Yuping.

      I’ve seen pictures of blue sky up there, so hopefully you have better luck!

      Like

    • journeydiva says:

      We will go in May on an off peak day, go on the mountain and just go on the eastern and western trail. that is where the sites are….thanks! If you are doing a re-do around the same time, see you on the mountain!

      Liked by 1 person

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